Genealogical Proof Standard
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Part Number: WXPROFSTAND_

Price: $9.95
With billions of indexed records available online, what methodologies should the researcher employ to best leverage these resources in keeping with genealogical standards?

This was presented to a live webinar audience on October 17, 2017. 1 hour 17minutes and 5 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of themonthlyorannualmembership.
Part Number: WXANALYCOR_

Price: $9.95
Careful analysis of individual records may reveal more evidence than we might think. Careful correlation combines all the evidence to solve difficult research problems.

This was presented to a live webinar audience on November 2, 2016. 1 hour 25 minutes, plus 4 pages of handouts.
Part Number: WXFANGPDNA_

Price: $9.95
Can you really 'prove' a female line when, for four straight generations, absolutely no document identifies a parent or sibling? Does the challenge seem hopeless when courthouses are burned and an illegitimacy is rumored? This session will demonstrate how to use three critical tools: (1) the FAN Principle to build a case for identity and parentage in each generation; (2) the Genealogical Proof Standard to create proof arguments; and (3) DNA testing—mitochondrial and autosomal—to confirm or disprove the validity of those proof arguments.

This was presented live at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists on October 7, 2016. 56 minutes. For more information about the Board for Certification of Genealogists and genealogy standards, visit www.bcgcertification.org.
Part Number: WXPROOFARG_

Price: $9.95
See examples of analyzing and correlating evidence, and how to resolve conflicts in genealogical evidence to reach conclusions. The genealogist owes it to herself and future generations to write down the mental reasoning that leads to these conclusions. Learn how to write down the mental process of establishing genealogical proof.
This was presented to a live webinar audience on March 30, 2016. 1 hour 44 minutes, plus 4 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXCOMPLEX_

Price: $9.95
A genealogist’s goal is to establish identity and prove relationships; complex evidence is the ONLY way to do this. Follow a case study of clues from multiple sources to solve a problem.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on October 28, 2015. 1 hour 42 minutes, plus 6 pages of handouts.
Part Number: WXTROUBLE_

Price: $9.95
For years Ron Arons researched the life of his great-grandfather, who served time in Sing Sing Prison and who committed other crimes. Through the years, Ron came across records for other people with the same first and last names, born in the same timeframe, who lived in the same places as his relative, and who, by some stroke of luck, also found trouble, either in business or with women. With such an uncommon name as Isaac Spier, this is rather remarkable. In this talk you will see how the Genealogical Proof Standard was used to merge and separate many identities to determine exactly how many distinct individuals these documents represented. (The answer is truly remarkable!) You will also learn about names, name changes, and the reasons behind those changes. You will also learn about mind maps, a powerful technology and methodology for clearer thinking, data logging, and, most importantly, efficient and extraordinary data correlation. Specifically, many examples of mind maps created with FreeMind will be presented. This entertaining excursion into the world of trouble makers offers methodologies for truly advanced research for very challenging problems.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on August 5, 2015. 1 hour 44 minutes, plus 1 page of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXINDEVIDC_

Price: $9.95
Direct evidence, the sort of evidence that completely answers a research question by itself, is often scarce. Without any documents telling us exactly what we want to know, how do we identify relationships that might not be stated explicitly, resolve conflicts between records, and arrive at sound genealogical conclusions? By collecting, analyzing, and correlating indirect evidence of course! The Henry McGinnis family of 19th century rural Pennsylvania provides a good example of using mostly indirect evidence to reconstruct a family which left precious little for descendants to work with.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on March 25, 2015. 1 hour 30 minutes, plus 4 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of themonthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXGETMOST_

Price: $9.95
You’ve found the document, now put it through the wringer. Consider: genealogical standards, provenance, jurisdiction, possible biases, etc.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on September 4, 2013. 1 hour 25 minutes. Plus 4 pages of handouts.The recording is also included as part of themonthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXEVIDENC2_

Price: $9.95
Do you find it difficult to determine what information you have found in reference to your ancestors is good or bad information? During this webinar you will be provided with suggestions that will help you sort out the evidence you are finding and how to carefully analyze the sources and data. This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on April 3, 2013. 1 hour 17 minutes, plus 4 pages of handouts.
Part Number: WXSEARCH_

Price: $9.95
The first step of the Genealogical Proof Standard is to "complete a reasonably exhaustive search for all relevant records" related to your research objective. This presentation discusses what a "reasonably exhaustive search" constitutes, why this is necessary, and how to conduct a search. A case study explores how failing to identify all relevant records can lead to missing information and forming inaccurate conclusions about your ancestors' lives.