African American
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Part Number: WXENSLAVED_

Price: $9.95
The first component of the Genealogical Proof Standard is the conduct of reasonably exhaustive research. This lecture will highlight the sources and strategies available to meet this requirement in the case of African American ancestors who were enslaved. Presented live at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogy.
 
This was presented to a live in-person and webinar audience on October 6, 2017. 1 hour and 2 minutes and 4 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXANALPROB_

Price: $9.95
This webinar will provide an overview of the probate process, the genealogical information that can be found in a slaveholding estate, and related records that a probate proceeding may point to.

This was presented to a live webinar audience on August 15, 2017. 1 hour 23 minutes plus 5 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXTRANRECS_

Price: $9.95
The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands are full of data reflecting newly freed slaves and their adapting to life after the Civil War. Among the lesser known records are those reflecting the movement of families in the years between 1865 – 1872. Some needed assistance in going back to communities were they were born, others were seeking a chance to begin new lives elsewhere. The records of various field offices vary in how the movement of former slaves were handled and there was no particular pattern in how they were documented. But transportation records reflect amazing data about the first voluntary migration of people of color during those post-Civil War years. This workshop will illustrate the content of these records, and how to locate them in the various Bureau field offices throughout the South.

This was presented to a live webinar audience on May 3, 2017. 1 hour 33 minutes plus 7 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXAFAMNEB_

Price: $9.95
After the Civil War, blacks began searching for a new life, new freedom which involved the quest for land or the security of employment. The passing of the Homestead Act in 1862 did not restrict the acquisition of land to only the white race. There was an opportunity for blacks from Canada, the east coast, the states along the Ohio River and the deep South to begin a new life. Nebraska was a promising area for new land owners. With the expansion of the west and more settlements, there was a need for military protection, thus many blacks became Buffalo Soldiers, eventually finding themselves at Fort Robinson or Fort Niobrara in Nebraska. As the railroad forged through Nebraska, it brought new settlements as well as employment. Blacks often worked in positions, such as porters, which brought pride and stability to their families. In order to research the lineages of the African-Americans who came to Nebraska, researchers need to use traditional methods of research, and also rely on a certain amount of family information and stories that interweave with the direct evidence found in documents. The research is unusual because of name changes, lack of knowledge of ages or places of birth, along with the innate problems of being a slave. This webinar explores the areas settled by blacks before and after their arrival in Nebraska, the time periods, why they came to Nebraska, their connections and influences. Emphasis will be placed on the types of records that are useful in this type of research and are applicable to other areas besides Nebraska.

2 hours 1 minute, plus 6 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXFREEDMEN_

Price: $9.95
Newly freed slaves needed assistance with food, shelter, rations and work for pay. The Freedmen’s Bureau served that purpose providing such aid. This webinar will focus on the records from the Bureau, and how these records will open doors before 1870, for the African American family.
 
1 hour 30 minutes, plus 9 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXCONFDNA_

Price: $9.95
With slave ancestral research, one is often faced with direct evidence vs. indirect evidence. Many forms of direct evidence that emphatically prove family relationships, birthplaces, and other happenings are often non-existent because slaves were merely considered “property”. Some researchers have been very fortunate to find rare pieces of direct evidence, in the form of old family letters, diaries, ledgers, Bibles, etc., to positively identify enslaved ancestors. Many researchers often rely on a preponderance of indirect evidence to confirm enslaved ancestors. Collier will present cases where DNA was the direct piece of evidence that identified or confirmed an enslaved ancestor.
 
This was presented to a live webinar audience on April 8, 2016. 1 hour 30 minutes, plus 5 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXMAPSAFR_

Price: $9.95
This session will illustrate how geography can tell you things unknown about your ancestral community and help provide a critical background for the family narrative.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on September 25, 2015. 1 hour 37 minutes, plus 5 pages of handouts.
Part Number: WXMENDING_

Price: $9.95
All slaves had family members who were sold away or transferred to the slave-owners' heirs, never to be seen again. Many even took different surnames. It was not uncommon for two displaced brothers to retain different surnames after Emancipation. Collier will present cases of how displaced family members were found.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on July 31 2015. 1 hour 34 minutes, plus 3 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXUSCOLAPP_

Price: $9.95
Explore the challenges faced by widows and/or former slave descendants of soldiers in the United States Colored Troops Widows’ Pension Applications.

This class was presented to a live webinar audience on April 24, 2015. 1 hour 14 minutes, plus 5 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXERAFREE_

Price: $9.95
The years right after the Civil War were critical years for all southerners white and black. Amazing records reflect that incredible time during those years. This session will explore several amazing record sets and will point to where they can be found.

This class was presented to a live webinar audience on February 20, 2015. 1 hour 28 minutes, plus 4 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXFREEDOM_

Price: $9.95
Researching the history of African American families can be complicated. With families once enslaved, the task involves tracing the family back in public records, identifying the last known slave holder, and then researching the slaveholder’s history to continue to document the family. However, one major story is often overlooked. The story of how freedom came to the family is the one story untold. This webinar will illustrate methods of discovering that missing story, and how to find clues when the ancestors left no stories behind.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on July 16, 2014. 1 hour 30 minutes plus 6 pages of handouts. The recording is also included as part of the monthly or annual membership.
Part Number: WXAFRICAN_

Price: $9.95
Internet sites are often sought when beginners start exploring family history. The challenge is where to turn to when researching African American ancestry. This webinar, presented by Angela Walton-Raji examines resources that provide guidance for the unique problems facing descendants of slaves.